Policy

As AI technologies have continued to evolve all over the world, it has become more and more evident that proper regulation is necessary.

Radiologists are in a position to demonstrate their value and lead the implementation of AI in healthcare—but keeping up with these evolving technologies is easier said than done.

As AI technologies continue to evolve, they could have a titanic impact on the health of people all over the world, improving patient outcomes and changing the way each and every person lives their life. It’s going to take more than just AI alone, however—there are a number of other factors to consider as well.

CMS has announced a new plan to “modernize” Medicare and find new ways to “protect taxpayers from fraud, waste and abuse.” Could AI technologies play key role in the agency’s strategy?

The rise of AI is an exciting change for healthcare providers all over the world, but implementing these groundbreaking technologies still comes with its fair share of significant challenges.  

Medical imaging professionals and radiation experts are in a position to play a significant role as AI technologies continue to evolve, according to a new commentary published in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences.

The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) hosted an open discussion on the future of AI on Wednesday, Oct. 16, in Washington, D.C. Topics included AI’s impact on the economy and how public policies may change in the near future as a response to these evolving technologies.

Two United Nations agencies have joined forces to create the Focus Group on Artificial Intelligence for Health (FG-AI4H)—a group of global representatives the UN hopes will help shape a streamlined, transparent process for vetting AI technologies in the healthcare space.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is about to undergo a massive, $16 billion revamp of its electronic health record (EHR) system. A month after a $10 million deal with Cerner was finalized, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) released a report that found the VA spent $3 billion on EHR support between 2015 and 2017.

Ethicists from the University of Basel have developed a biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology while calling for a ban on dual-use technology with the aim of regulating mental privacy and integrity of humans. Findings were published in Neuron.

As cyberattack become increasingly common incidents, healthcare professionals must push security to the forefront. In a presentation given at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in Chicago, Jim Whitfill, CMO of innovation Health Partners and president of Lumetis, described the current cybersecurity environment and detailed how professionals can take steps toward improving privacy.

Despite increased prevention efforts and longer lifespans, heart failure rates are at a high in the United Kingdom and are continuing to climb, according to new research published in The Lancet.