Case Studies

Lawrence Tanenbaum is a big believer in AI, as a tool to create better images, offer a more comprehensive view of a patient and more effectively handle imaging’s increasing volume and complexity. Bigger yet, AI is the impetus to change the way radiology and medicine are practiced across the care spectrum.

The power of artificial intelligence (AI) is enabling clinical breakthroughs that identify biomarkers without invasive procedures, diagnose skin cancer with a photograph, predict adverse clinical events, and recommend treatments based on current literature. Getting these innovations to market requires access to large, complex data sets to train the AI models.

Healthcare is in an intense era of retooling, similar to the Industrial Revolution of several centuries ago. Bright minds in healthcare and technology are shaping new tools powered and empowered by artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning. This burgeoning Age of Intelligence is matching minds and machines to sharpen knowledge and insight to improve the delivery of care for patients, populations, practitioners and providers. 

Artificial intelligence (AI) is rewiring the way we think about healthcare. And rewiring the way doctors predict, diagnose and treat disease, how exams are carried out and how health systems are run. Is AI a game-changer? Absolutely, and the game is changing a lot faster than many think.

West Feliciana Hospital (WFH) has been serving patients in the small town of St. Francisville, Louisiana, since 1970, but its imaging capabilities were limited for a long time. As a result, the hospital gained a bit of a reputation among referring physicians in the area—when in doubt, they would just avoid WFH altogether and send patients more than 30 miles away to Baton Rouge.

The Miami Cancer Institute (MCI) started nearly 10 years ago as a collection of widely distributed service lines without an identifiable physical presence. The idea was to bring together local and regional cancer experts from every medical discipline and every support service. The vision was mass collaboration around providing world-class cancer care to patients from across the Southeastern U.S. as well as Latin America and the Caribbean.

Natural language processing (NLP)—the concept of training computer programs to extract specific content from words and phrases—has existed in one form or another since the 1950s, but its potential to impact radiology has only been brought into focus in recent years. Vendors all over the world, including vRad, a MEDNAX company, are working around the clock to see just how much NLP can do to revolutionize healthcare—and they are finding that it can do quite a lot.

Today’s radiology leaders face a significant number of challenges, including complex reimbursement policies, evolving technologies, and increasing demands for 24/7 subspecialty care. MEDNAX Radiology Solutions hosted a webinar on Feb. 21, 2018, that focused on these challenges and what leaders can do to ensure their practices thrive in today’s growing, competitive marketplace.

When five-hospital health system HIMA San Pablo sent an imaging contingent from its home base in Puerto Rico to RSNA in Chicago back in 2003, no one in the group could have foreseen how fortuitous their trip to the Windy City would prove almost a decade and a half later. 

If you’re going to operate a hospital outpatient imaging facility so distant to the nearest city that your location overlooks a sprawling cow pasture, you need to give patients a reason to make the drive. OGH Imaging in Grand Coteau, LA.—population 939—has been doing just that ever since opening its doors in 2005. 

Six years ago, the non-invasive cardiovascular lab (NICL) at 540-bed St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi, faced something of an uncertain future. The rules for maintaining accreditation, set by intersocietal accreditation commissions, require that all vascular exams get interpreted within 48 hours of image acquisition. For cardiac exams, the read must wait no longer than 24 hours.

2018 has already been a year full of breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, and those technologies are sure to receive a lot of attention March 5-9 at HIMSS 2018 in Las Vegas.