News

A new building is soon to rise in New York City inside which will buzz myriad medical research and clinical activities involving AI.  

Stanford researchers have developed an AI tool that can help diagnose damaging brain aneurysms that can have potentially fatal effects.

A year ago, U.S. military researchers presented an algorithm that can tell an individual how much caffeine to consume, and when, to achieve optimal alertness. Now they’ve turned the technique into a freely available tool for “designing effective strategies to maximize alertness while avoiding excessive caffeine consumption.”

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy often share word of their adverse reactions to the drugs in online health forums. Researchers at Stanford have used natural language processing to mine these posts, accurately flagging detrimental side effects well before clinical journals advise caution.

A convolutional neural network has proven better than traditional equations, indexes and scoring systems at predicting which hospitalized patients will face readmission not long after being sent home.  

Retail giant Walmart has joined a blockchain group that aims to track and verify prescription drugs, the company confirmed to CoinDesk.

The vast majority of healthcare executives––89%––are experimenting with emerging technologies such as AI, according to Accenture’s Digital Health Technology Vision report.

Whether or not its pending $68 billion purchase of Aetna gets finalized, CVS Health will pump big bucks into broadening its menu of healthcare services and personalizing them for consumers. And a key component of its plan is a data-analytics strategy steeped in AI.

UCLA Health is synthesizing vast amounts of data by deploying new Microsoft cloud computing services, Microsoft Azure, that will speed up medical discoveries and improve patient care.

Using a deep neural network equipped with all patient information relevant to diagnosing adult asthma, researchers in Japan have achieved 98% diagnostic accuracy.

Hoping to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration around Big Data over the next 50 to 100 years, Boston University is preparing to build a 17-story architectural marvel.

Facial recognition technology can be used to monitor sedated patients in intensive care units, alerting healthcare workers when a patient is at risk of accidentally removing a breathing tube or engaging in other risky behavior.