Forward-looking providers are converting reams of data from myriad sources into innovative new ways to deliver healthcare and improve efficiencies.

As costs continue to rise, healthcare organizations must become more efficient with collecting, says Anthony Cunningham, MBA, vice president of Patient Financial Services at Wake Forest Baptist Health. One approach, he explains, is deploying staff away from repetitive tasks and “toward high-value-add work.” That’s where artificial intelligence comes in.

A new project is seeking to make MRI scans up to 10 times faster by capturing less data. NYU’s Center for Advanced Imaging Innovation and Research (CAI2R) is working with the Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research group to “train artificial neural networks to recognize the underlying structure of the images to fill in views omitted from the accelerated scan.”

Machine learning is one of the hottest topics in radiology and all of healthcare, but reading the latest and greatest ML research can be difficult, even for experienced medical professionals. A new analysis written by a team at Northern Ireland’s Belfast City Hospital and published in the American Journal of Roentgenology was written with that very problem in mind.

A compilation of the latest news in AI and machine learning

As an integrated health-delivery network comprising 13 hospital campuses, two research centers and a health plan with more than half a million subscribers sitting atop the biggest biobank with whole exome (DNA) sequence data in existence, Pennsylvania’s Geisinger Health System is one of the best-positioned institutions in the U.S. to explore the possibilities and initial successes of AI in healthcare. The institution is bringing complex algorithmic concepts to everyday patient care and showing others the path forward.

It’s all about the data. We’ve been saying this for years. We can choose to look at this in one of two ways. It’s either a constant truism or it actually evolves and gains mass over time. In the age of artificial intelligence, it is both. 

Artificial and augmented intelligence are driving the future of medical imaging. Tectonic is the only way to describe the trend. And medical imaging is at the right place at the right time. Imaging stands to get better, stronger, faster and more efficient thanks to artificial intelligence, including machine learning, deep learning, convolutional neural networks and natural language processing. So why is medical imaging ripe for AI? Check out the opportunities and hear what experts have to say—and see what you should be doing now if you haven’t already started.

When it comes to teaching new dogs new tricks, radiology training programs need to be thinking about updating their curricula and preparing for both the short- and the long-term effects of AI and machine learning, according to “Toward Augmented Radiologists,” a new commentary published online in March in Academic Radiology.

Ever the visionary, Paul Chang sees AI as an asset to radiologists. As he sees it, “AI and deep learning doesn’t replace us. It frees us to do more valuable work.” The vice chair of radiology informatics at University of Chicago Medicine takes a quick look through the crystal ball at the four stand-out challenges facing radiology with the rise of AI.

To look into the future is to catch only a glimpse inside Simon Warfield’s radiology research lab at Boston Children’s Hospital. His team is pairing hyperfast imaging and deep learning to push the limits of medical imaging and artificial intelligence (AI) to identify, prevent and treat disease. He’s also eyeing ways AI will help as data sharing expands among research sites. “The research world needs to look forward to manage forward,” he says.

AI is hotter than hot in healthcare, according to AI market watcher CB Insights. Healthcare-AI funding reached $2.14 billion across 323 deals from 2012 through the second quarter of 2017—and has consistently been the top industry for AI deals.