Conferences

RSNA 2019 in Chicago is just days away, and the continued evolution of AI in radiology promises to be one of the hottest topics of the entire conference.

AI can identify patients at risk of dying—of any cause—within the next year or of developing an irregular heartbeat, according to two new studies to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019.

RSNA 2019, the world’s largest radiology conference, kicks off at Chicago’s McCormick Place on Sunday, Dec. 1. This year's show promises to include more AI content than ever before.

An artificial intelligence “super brain” could help eliminate unnecessary diagnostic testing in patients who present with stable chest pain, according to a recent study, potentially saving physicians and patients significant time and money.

An AI model built by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology helps robots better predict how they’ll interact with solid objects and liquids, improving their ability to mold deformable materials.

AI is poised to make a sizable impact on healthcare this year, but we’ll likely see the greatest dent in the areas of medical imaging, diagnostics and suicide risk prediction, according to data presented at the Partners HealthCare World Medical Innovation Forum in Boston.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a model that cuts the training time for deep learning networks by up to 69%.

Fourteen startups are getting a share of $117 million from Intel Capital, which is encouraging the recipients to spend the money on efforts to “disrupt their industries.” For two of the companies, the industry is healthcare and the disruptive innovation involves AI.

Though AI systems have shown promise for detecting skin cancer, more work is needed before they can be utilized in “real world” applications, according to researchers at the 2019 American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

As the healthcare industry continues to embrace AI and unlock its potential, Humana Chief Medical Officer Roy Beveridge, MD, believes the technology will transform patient care.

The Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) is looking to transform electronic health records (EHRs) by leveraging voice and AI technology to allow EHRs to naturally interact with physicians to find relevant information and hopefully enhance patient care.  

Flagler Hospital, a 335-bed community hospital based in St. Augustine, Florida, is projected to save more than $20 million after AI technology helped it reduce costs, average length of stay and readmissions for pneumonia patients.